Geographically Weighted Regression Workshop

The goal of this workshop on Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) is to introduce GWR as a modeling technique for local spatial analysis. GWR allows local, as opposed to global, spatial models to be calibrated and for interesting variations in relationships to be measured and mapped. A. Stewart Fotheringham, Martin Charlton, and Chris Brunsdon are the pioneers in this field and developers of the GWR package. They were the lead presenters in GISPopSci-sponsored workshops on Geographically Weighted Regression in 2008 (Penn State) and 2010 (UCSB).

The standard procedure in the vast majority of empirical analyses of spatial data is either to calculate a global statistic or to calibrate a global model. The term “global” implies that all the spatial data are used to compute a single statistic that is essentially an average of the conditions that exist throughout the study area in which the data have been measured. Such a procedure is flawed when the relationships being measured vary over space. GWR is a statistical technique that allows variations in relationships over space to be measured within a single modeling framework. The output from GWR is a set of surfaces that can be mapped and measured, where each surface depicts the spatial variation of a relationship. The technique is based on regular regression modeling but can be extended in many different ways. It provides a great richness in the results obtained for any spatial data set and should be useful across all disciplines in which spatial data are used. This modeling approach challenges many of the global statements of spatial relationships that have been made in the academic literature. The authors have written Windows-based, user-friendly software for GWR, which is available through the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/geoinformatics/gwr/gwr-software/.

Click on the titles of the following lectures to view the related slide presentations. The slide presentations for this workshop are currently password protected for access by participants in prior UCSB and Penn State workshops offered as part of the GISPopSci (20052006) and Advanced Spatial Analysis (20082011) series. If you have questions about access, please contact us.

The students who completed this workshop created presentations during the course of their study. A list of these students and these projects can be found here.

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